The New School https://tnsatlanta.org ReThinking Education Fri, 18 Oct 2019 15:07:42 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.2.4 College? Yes! https://tnsatlanta.org/blog/college-yes/ https://tnsatlanta.org/blog/college-yes/#respond Thu, 17 Oct 2019 14:08:57 +0000 https://tnsatlanta.org/?p=1357561

The Same and Different We talk a lot about what sets The New School apart from other Atlanta high schools. But it’s also important to mention the similarities. For instance, AP classes and challenging academics. Curious about a typical week? Click on this 9th grade schedule which will appear in your downloads. TNS currently offers […]

The post College? Yes! appeared first on The New School.

]]>

The Same and Different
We talk a lot about what sets The New School apart from other Atlanta high schools. But it’s also important to mention the similarities. For instance, AP classes and challenging academics. Curious about a typical week? Click on this 9th grade schedule which will appear in your downloads. TNS currently offers 9 different AP classes across 6 disciplines.

College Admissions
This week, like most, admissions representatives from six different colleges, hailing from all around the country, huddled with small groups of students, often over lunch. TNS grads are known for deep engagement when they get to college, right off the bat, and college admissions officers are paying attention. TNS alumni attend fantastic public schools like UGA, Ga Tech and Indiana University as well as private colleges and universities like Davidson, NYU and W&L. Students who know themselves end up making great decisions about the right college. Check out our college matriculation data to see where TNS alums are now.

Want to hear more from TNS students? Sign up for our Information Session at Horizon Theatre on October 22nd.

We can’t wait to meet you! 

The post College? Yes! appeared first on The New School.

]]>
https://tnsatlanta.org/blog/college-yes/feed/ 0
Do You Recognize This Photo? https://tnsatlanta.org/blog/do-you-recognize-this-photo/ https://tnsatlanta.org/blog/do-you-recognize-this-photo/#respond Wed, 02 Oct 2019 15:54:16 +0000 https://tnsatlanta.org/?p=1357549

  Do you recognize The New School building from this angle? Looking East with a wide view of our new courtyard?  We’ve been amazed by the way changing our frame of reference can create shifts in our perspective.  Whether students are seeing the city for the first time through the lens of recent immigrants or […]

The post Do You Recognize This Photo? appeared first on The New School.

]]>

 

Do you recognize The New School building from this angle? Looking East with a wide view of our new courtyard?  We’ve been amazed by the way changing our frame of reference can create shifts in our perspective. 

Whether students are seeing the city for the first time through the lens of recent immigrants or trying to understand the shifting narrative of Oakland Cemetery, we’re working hard to stay limber in our thinking and curiosity.

Each week Peter Lefkowicz, the TNS Head of School, sends out the Weekly Update so parents can catch up with their students’ world. Here’s a recent excerpt: 

Community-Engaged Learning
The Atlanta Project: Telling Atlanta’s Stories started with a tour of Oakland Cemetery, where our guide focused on how the Cemetery’s narrative has shifted over time. Then on Thursday we took a trip to The Atlanta History Center to explore how they use visual and audio media as well as historical artifacts to create historical narratives. The group focused on our Atlanta Project: Climate Change visited the Trees Atlanta Treehouse and took a tour of the Beltline while talking about tree conservation and tree identification. As a group, we have been working on a presentation that includes our survey results of TNS students (and their opinions/knowledge about climate change). Students will  complete a carbon footprint calculator that estimates their carbon usage for an entire year. In the ATL Project: Food and Music, students crunched data from the surveys they administered last week and began drafting a visual for that data, in addition to visiting the Atlanta History Center on Thursday to begin pieces together how the history of Atlanta has shaped the food and music industries we know today. In Entrepreneurship, students presented on their experience during the “$5 Challenge” where students had an afternoon to generate as much money or social value from their $5. One lesson was that the $5 didn’t make a difference and that the students already have skills and resources at their disposal to create a lot of value already! On Thursday we began our journey into “customer discovery” with an inspirational trip to Chick fil-A’s enterprise innovation center – The Hatch. We learned that their innovation process (Understand, Imagine, Prototype, Validate and Launch), is incredibly similar to the process our students go through, and learned the benefit of re-framing failure as “unexpected outcomes!”

In other words, besides doing challenging academic work in every subject, TNS students are in the city doing original research. 

Want to learn more about Community Engaged Learning? Check out his recent blog post?

Want to hear more from TNS students? Sign up for our Information Session at Horizon Theatre on October 22nd.

We can’t wait to meet you! 

The post Do You Recognize This Photo? appeared first on The New School.

]]>
https://tnsatlanta.org/blog/do-you-recognize-this-photo/feed/ 0
Essential Principles of Community-Engaged Learning – Part I https://tnsatlanta.org/blog/principles-community-engaged-learning/ https://tnsatlanta.org/blog/principles-community-engaged-learning/#respond Thu, 26 Sep 2019 17:50:57 +0000 https://tnsatlanta.org/?p=1357519

We know that Community-Engaged Learning (CEL) experiences during the high school years have the potential to profoundly affect students and transform traditional secondary education. With such ambitious goals, it should come as no surprise that doing Community-Engaged Learning right is no easy task. CEL experiences can range from year-long internships, to extended projects focused on […]

The post Essential Principles of Community-Engaged Learning – Part I appeared first on The New School.

]]>

We know that Community-Engaged Learning (CEL) experiences during the high school years have the potential to profoundly affect students and transform traditional secondary education. With such ambitious goals, it should come as no surprise that doing Community-Engaged Learning right is no easy task. CEL experiences can range from year-long internships, to extended projects focused on solving a local problem, to one-day excursions to work with a community partner. But no matter their scope, great Community-Engaged Learning experiences share some common basic principles, which practitioners can use to design, implement, and evaluate those experiences.

In short, those principles state that Community-Engaged Learning experiences should:

  1. Center itself around an essential question for inquiry which engages a contemporary issue or need in a student community.
  2. Connect students to adults doing work related to the project’s essential question.
  3. Use the city (or another community) as a classroom.
  4. End with a student-produced final product which can be shared with the community at large via exhibition or other presentation.
  5. Contain a mix of collaborative and individual work.
  6. Provide opportunities for students to practice skills and/or apply knowledge they have learned within the project or in academic classes. 
  7. Offer ways for students to make meaningful choices within the work.
  8. Present opportunities for regular reflection so students can discuss progress, learn from decisions/actions and re-adjust as needed. 
  9. Have a clear structure with incremental mileposts.
  10. Include an evaluation rubric that students and teachers develop collaboratively. 

In this article, we’ll take a look at the first of those core principles, the one related to essential questions. As we’ll see, for successful CEL work, this principle isn’t optional, but forms the basis of the learning that students do throughout the project.

Essential Principle #1: Ask an Essential Question

The first essential principle of CEL is that the experience has an essential question for inquiry, which engages a contemporary issue of need. This principle helps students see the relevance of their actions around issues at play in their own communities or in the larger world. It also serves to motivate students to become actors in the world, and to understand their own agency.

The essential question principle acts as the anchor for the entire CEL experience, from ideation and planning through execution and assessment. It should be broad enough to allow students to find their own points of entry into individual experiences, specific enough to ask as a guardrail that keeps both teachers and students from straying too far from their goals, and directive enough to give students a roadmap for their work in the community.

What’s the Point?

One of the most common refrains around high schools, kitchen tables, and wherever teenagers do their schoolwork is “What’s the point?” Having a well-crafted essential question answers that question, by providing students will the big-picture goal of whatever they are working on. Even if students are frustrated with the particular piece of work they are doing as part of a long community-engaged learning experience, having an essential question in their back pockets helps them see why their work today is important in the context of the larger project they’re working on.

A Real World Example

Let’s take a look at a couple of possible essential questions and run them through those parameters. Here’s a possible essential question for a project on immigration: “What factors contribute to successful relocation of new immigrants?” Sound good? Well, this question is certainly broad enough to give students many different entry points into the project, and many different ways to focus their work. But it’s too broad, in that it doesn’t differentiate between different immigrant groups, different socioeconomic conditions, or even different locations. Asking this question with respect to well-educated British immigrants relocating to large U.S. cities would likely lead to very different answers than asking it with respect to undocumented Syrian immigrants relocating to Germany.

What’s a Community?

But from the standpoint of Community-Engaged Learning, the first flaw in this essential question points to a second: a lack of direction. What is the contemporary issue or need addressed by this project? What student community is being addressed? To give students a sense of purpose, educators have to show how the work they’ve designed for students is work that actually matters, to students, in those students’ communities.

That community can be defined as broadly or as narrowly as teachers and students determine is appropriate, but it has to be defined at this early stage of project planning. So at the narrow end, the question could focus on the factors that help immigrants achieve success in the students’ own school. A wider lens might look at a nearby immigrant community, or a variety of immigrant communities in the area. An even broader definition of community might see students studying immigration policy at the state or national level, and measuring the effects in various localities. As we can see, however community is defined, that definition suddenly makes the community-engaged learning experience real for students and teachers alike, and adds to the urgency and focus of the work they do.

Many Revisions

So, how could we revise that earlier essential question to make it a true CEL question? In as many ways as there are teachers and student communities. Here’s one that would be appropriate to Atlanta: “How do family ties, international enclaves, and local non-profits combine to help new immigrants succeed in a rapidly changing Atlanta society?” That sounds like an interesting question, one that will take students out into their community to come up with real world solutions to real world problems. That’s community-engaged learning at its best.

Would you like to receive blogs like this sent to your inbox monthly? Subscribe here.

The post Essential Principles of Community-Engaged Learning – Part I appeared first on The New School.

]]>
https://tnsatlanta.org/blog/principles-community-engaged-learning/feed/ 0
What Are the Benefits of Community-Engaged Learning? https://tnsatlanta.org/blog/what-are-the-benefits-of-community-engaged-learning/ https://tnsatlanta.org/blog/what-are-the-benefits-of-community-engaged-learning/#respond Tue, 13 Aug 2019 13:59:24 +0000 https://tnsatlanta.org/?p=1357472

One of the most promising movements to emerge in recent years in high school education is Community-Engaged Learning (CEL). Done well, CEL has the potential to increase student engagement, deepen the learning that students do across the curriculum, and greatly improve the college readiness of students. These are heady goals. But before we examine them, […]

The post What Are the Benefits of Community-Engaged Learning? appeared first on The New School.

]]>

One of the most promising movements to emerge in recent years in high school education is Community-Engaged Learning (CEL). Done well, CEL has the potential to increase student engagement, deepen the learning that students do across the curriculum, and greatly improve the college readiness of students. These are heady goals. But before we examine them, it’s important to ask a more foundational question: What do we mean when we talk about Community-Engaged Learning in high schools?

What is Community-Engaged Learning?

Community-Engaged Learning is a term that encompasses a variety of educational experiences, but they do have some common characteristics. CEL experiences take students outside the walls of the traditional classroom and into one or more communities. They do this in order to expand student perspectives, get students working with community partners who are subject-area experts, and create opportunities to apply classroom learning in real world scenarios.

What might that look like in practice? One type of CEL experience for high school students is primarily instructor-designed. An example of this type of project might have science students working with local public works officials and water quality scientists to understand both watershed management and drinking water purity, to develop easy-to-use water testing kits, and to generate interest in local water testing by creating social media campaigns. Another instructor-designed CEL experience might have students studying history acting as actual historians in a specific community, researching public records and doing oral history interviews with local residents, which could culminate in local history exhibition or publication that students produce.

Students Directing the Shape of Their Education

As students mature, and gain experience working in their communities on these kinds of projects, they also develop a number of skills that make them ready for more student-designed CEL experiences. One way to encourage this growing independence is with an entrepreneurship program, where students learn the ins and outs of business from young people doing interesting work with local start-ups. Then, students would be set up to start their own businesses (profit or not-for-profit), tackling unmet community needs or specific local problems.

Another student-designed CEL experience is an internship program. Internships are most appropriate for high school juniors and seniors, as students will have to have a high level of maturity to work independently outside the school. But the benefits of internships for high school students are enormous.

High Student Engagement

One of the most important advantages of community-engaged learning for high school students is an increase in student engagement. We’ve all heard students say about the work they’re doing in high school, “What’s the point?” We may have even said such a thing ourselves from time to time, and with good reason. Much of the work that students do in high school does seem to be pointless. And teachers are often not good at communicating the relevance of subject matter to students.

Community-engaged learning directly answers this question. Students see the point in the work they’re doing because they’re doing real work in the world, as opposed to worksheets in the classroom. And once students see the point of their work, their engagement increases as well. Students want to learn Statistics, because they’ve just administered a survey they wrote to people in their community, and no they have data to analyze. Students master the ins and outs of persuasive writing, and they see the value of revision, because they’re presenting a proposal to their city councilperson or state representative, and they want it to be perfect.

In short, CEL goes a long way toward creating students who really want to learn. It creates a culture of engaged learners by constantly giving students opportunities to apply the learning they’re doing in their academic classes to real world experiences that matter to them.

Deeper Learning

One problem with keeping students engaged in traditional high school courses is that the breadth of material that those courses cover means that students don’t have the time or opportunity to go deep into areas that interest them. The saying about the typical high school World History survey course is that it covers the history of the world, on every continent, from the Big Bang to the present day. That’s a bit of an exaggeration, but with that kind of scope, students rarely get the opportunity to be really interested in what they’re learning before it’s time to move on to the next thing.

Community-Engaged Learning experiences encourage students to explore a deeper level of learning. CEL projects often utilize mentors in the community, address real problems that communities are grappling with, and let students do work that is meaningful to them. These are the ingredients of deep learning, which focuses on thinking critically and solving complex problems; communicating effectively; and being empowered through self-directed learning.

A Head Start on College

Colleges and universities in the U.S. are already shifting to Community-Engaged Learning models for much of their coursework. Stanford University alone offers over 150 courses with CEL components. And students who are already well versed in CEL, and the essential skills necessary to thrive in these kinds of learning environments, start their college experiences with a head start on their peers. After all, they’ve spent their high school years leading teams, taking responsibility for their own learning, and doing real work in the real world.

Would you like to receive blogs like this sent to your inbox monthly? Subscribe here.

The post What Are the Benefits of Community-Engaged Learning? appeared first on The New School.

]]>
https://tnsatlanta.org/blog/what-are-the-benefits-of-community-engaged-learning/feed/ 0
Inaugural TNS Ultimate Season Ends in Spirit Award for the Team https://tnsatlanta.org/blog/inaugural-tns-ultimate-season-ends-spirit-award-team/ https://tnsatlanta.org/blog/inaugural-tns-ultimate-season-ends-spirit-award-team/#respond Tue, 27 Jun 2017 19:18:15 +0000 http://tnsatlanta.org/?p=1356713

The New School completed its inaugural ultimate frisbee season with a bang this year! The team got off to a great start with 13 committed players, including a couple of players from Maynard Jackson. Our main goals this year were to develop as players and as a team, and to compete in the state championship. […]

The post Inaugural TNS Ultimate Season Ends in Spirit Award for the Team appeared first on The New School.

]]>

The New School completed its inaugural ultimate frisbee season with a bang this year! The team got off to a great start with 13 committed players, including a couple of players from Maynard Jackson. Our main goals this year were to develop as players and as a team, and to compete in the state championship. We were led by captains Austin Thomas and Ted Anderson. Ted used his knowledge from previous ultimate experience and Austin motivated the team through his high intensity play and inspiring speeches. Overall we met and exceeded our season goals. Every player improved dramatically over the course of the season and started to find their roles on the team.

At the end of the season, we were given the Spirit Award for the JV Boys Division. Spirit of the game is extremely important in ultimate as all play is self officiated. It is up to each individual player to learn the rules, make their own calls, and discuss them in a sportsman’s like manner on the field. It was a great honor for us to receive this award, especially in our first season as a team, and great validation that the values and community engagement that our students work on every day at The New School are helping them grow into positive role models and citizens. 

This season, we developed strong fundamentals and now have a great foundation to work with, especially since most players will be returning.We are unfortunately saying good bye to Ethan Davey as he will be attending Georgia Tech next year (congratulations Ethan!). He will be sorely missed as he was an amazing teammate and major contributor on the field. I am excited to see how TNS Ultimate will continue to improve next year! 

Kat Smith – TNS Ultimate Coach

TNS Ultimate

TNS Owls Ultimate

The post Inaugural TNS Ultimate Season Ends in Spirit Award for the Team appeared first on The New School.

]]>
https://tnsatlanta.org/blog/inaugural-tns-ultimate-season-ends-spirit-award-team/feed/ 0
Speaker Series – Nicole Jones (Delta) https://tnsatlanta.org/news/speaker-series-nicole-jones-delta/ https://tnsatlanta.org/news/speaker-series-nicole-jones-delta/#respond Mon, 16 Jan 2017 19:47:54 +0000 http://tnsatlanta.org/?p=1356624

Our Friday Speaker Series kicked off with a moving and inspirational session with Nicole Jones, Global Innovation Leader at Delta. Nicole was interviewed, by 10th grader, Austin (and ultimately the whole school chipped in with questions) who gave us a mixture of her incredible personal story, and insight into the exciting work happening at Delta […]

The post Speaker Series – Nicole Jones (Delta) appeared first on The New School.

]]>

Our Friday Speaker Series kicked off with a moving and inspirational session with Nicole Jones, Global Innovation Leader at Delta. Nicole was interviewed, by 10th grader, Austin (and ultimately the whole school chipped in with questions) who gave us a mixture of her incredible personal story, and insight into the exciting work happening at Delta and new movements in corporate innovation. Thanks Nicole for a great end to the week and a perfect start to the speaker series!

The post Speaker Series – Nicole Jones (Delta) appeared first on The New School.

]]>
https://tnsatlanta.org/news/speaker-series-nicole-jones-delta/feed/ 0
Speaker Series – Kat Cole (President, Focus Brands) https://tnsatlanta.org/news/kat-cole-speaker-series/ https://tnsatlanta.org/news/kat-cole-speaker-series/#respond Sun, 20 Nov 2016 23:30:12 +0000 http://tnsatlanta.org/?p=1356598

On Friday, TNS student, Julia, conducted a brilliant interview with the amazing Kat Cole, President of Focus Brands. Kat spoke to our students about grit and how to forge a better world. The students left class inspired to go out and make a difference, and the faculty learned as much from the talk as the students […]

The post Speaker Series – Kat Cole (President, Focus Brands) appeared first on The New School.

]]>

On Friday, TNS student, Julia, conducted a brilliant interview with the amazing Kat Cole, President of Focus Brands. Kat spoke to our students about grit and how to forge a better world. The students left class inspired to go out and make a difference, and the faculty learned as much from the talk as the students did. Here are some points from Kat’s talk I think we can all benefit from.

  1. Be awesome every day.
  2. Balance curiosity and humility with compassion and confidence.
  3. Don’t seek perfection. Seek progress.
  4. Stay positive and resourceful.
  5. Be your own opposite. Don’t let yourself slack off but don’t be too hard on yourself either.
  6. Deliver results by managing your energy instead of your time.
  7. If you look “young” for your job, make sure your professional behavior makes up for it. 
  8. Always go above and beyond.
  9. FAIL is actually an acronym – First Attempt In Learning
  10. Know your roots but don’t you dare let them define you.
  11. Find a growth company to work for – you’ll have a greater chance for internal promotions that lead to greater responsibilities faster. 
  12. Tie your sister to a tree and thank your mom.*
  13. Find the right people.
  14. Cross oceans.

The last point is the one that tugs at my heart the most. There is an ocean between the world we are and the world we could be. Although I’m not a futurist, I am an optimist and I hope that the world holds more people like Kat who cross oceans and lead others to do the same.

P.S. If you literally cross oceans like Kat’s husband, Daley  you get extra credit.

*Just checking that you’re reading! There was an important message behind this though – to learn responsibility at an early age. 

The post was written by Rostam Zafari, TNS Entrepreneur in Residence

The post Speaker Series – Kat Cole (President, Focus Brands) appeared first on The New School.

]]>
https://tnsatlanta.org/news/kat-cole-speaker-series/feed/ 0
The Infamous Weekly Update https://tnsatlanta.org/blog/infamous-weekly-update/ https://tnsatlanta.org/blog/infamous-weekly-update/#respond Sun, 25 Sep 2016 13:18:05 +0000 http://tnsatlanta.org/?p=1356558

Each week Peter Lefkowicz, the Head of School, sends a weekly email update to all TNS families. It’s one example of how much we value communication and staying connected. Teachers craft the discipline-specific news. Parents scan through for the sections that are relevant to their student. Dinner table conversations get a boost. Here’s a sample: Dear […]

The post The Infamous Weekly Update appeared first on The New School.

]]>

Each week Peter Lefkowicz, the Head of School, sends a weekly email update to all TNS families. It’s one example of how much we value communication and staying connected. Teachers craft the discipline-specific news. Parents scan through for the sections that are relevant to their student. Dinner table conversations get a boost. Here’s a sample:

Dear TNS Families,

Well, it apparently turned to autumn this week. Sweater weather, turning leaves, etc. Or, here in Atlanta, another month of 90 degree days. Here’s hoping we’ll be able to shut the A/C off by Halloween. On to the update:

This week in College Counseling, we welcomed our first college representative, Federico Gitman of Lynn University in Florida. Lynn’s business program features the kind of innovation that our students appreciate from their own community engagement and entrepreneurship here at TNS.  The students asked great questions to begin with but Freddy also gave them some pointers on how to take advantage of opportunities like this one.

Last week, in addition to speaking with parents at College Night, Ginger had her second monthly meeting with the juniors. They talked about what factors to consider when starting a college search and did an exercise to help students learn something about their own preferences since knowing yourself is the most important first step.

9th Grade Math students have been submerged in the world of linear functions. They’ve become true experts in working with all forms of linear functions and modeling with them. Some of the kids in this wonderful group have been placed in an advanced math program that will take a bit more effort and some extra time for homework. There will be a chapter test next Wednesday.10th Grade Math-II folks have been having a lot of fun manipulating rational expressions. They will complete this chapter next week and take a test on Friday10th Grade Precalculus youngsters have spent this week analyzing all kinds of functions and connecting them to a real life situations. Very entertaining! They will learn about composition and inverse functions next week and hopefully will complete the chapter. 11th Grade Precalculus group is inching to the end of chapter 2. Kids will explore the universe of warm and fuzzy circles and their equations next week, will work on chapter review and take a test on Thursday or Friday. In AP Calculus, students finished up the Intro to Limits portion of the course with a quiz, before launching back in to some more differentiation techniques including the product and quotient rules, and differentiation of trigonometric functions. 

In Drama, the players, having now solidly memorized their parts, shifted their emphasis to acting, focusing on active listening in the midst of a scene. On Wednesday, many Drama students missed class due to a Georgia Aquarium trip, but those that were in class got a treat. They headed over to Horizon and worked with professional scenic artists and carpenters, making tree trunks from chicken wire and muslin, among other sets and props, all of which will be put to use in Horizon Theatre’s world premiere of the mystery/comedy Freed Spirits, for which Horizon has recreated Oakland Cemetery on its Little 5 Points stage. Opening night is tonight!

Filmmaking students watched Rushmore to conclude the Tarantino/Wes Anderson mini-marathon.Wednesday was an in-class workday, where students started putting the finishing touches on their poetic documentaries, which they submitted today in final form. We screened them all together and talked about them in class. Really happy with what the students produced.

Design students split their time this week between indulging their inner ceramicists, as their work in clay began to take shape, and starting to imagine the project that they will be working on to install at the Georgia Aquarium, which they visited on Wednesday.

This week in Spanish 1, we focused on food (vocabulary) and how to talk about food with the verb to like (gustar). In groups, the students researched and presented a recipe in Spanish, which eventually they will cook for their classmates. In Spanish 2 we worked with verbs and adjectives, as students identified these grammatical structures in songs and short texts. Spanish 3 students learned how to use the present subjunctive in Spanish. We practiced the uses of this grammatical form in short passages, songs, and exercises.

Humanities 9 students completed rough drafts of their The Hunger Games essays, which the put through a peer editing workshop on Thursday. Final Drafts are due Monday in class. 
 
Humanities 10 students worked on two more early American short stories, and have begun writing analytical essays on the stories. Rough drafts due Wednesday, September 28. Final drafts due Monday, October 3.
This week in English 11/AP Language, all the skills we’ve been learning this semester began to come together as we explored writing rhetorical analyses. We looked at several examples by students, examining how these essays succeeded in their analysis, as well as how they fell short. We worked on performing our own rhetorical analyses of texts from various genres–current opinion pieces, historical documents, even clips from The Daily Show–so that students will be prepared for the upcoming essay.

In 9th Grade Projects, students began crafting surveys related to their research questions, and we had an awesome trip to the Mail Chimp offices at Ponce City Market, where we got a tour of what is surely the coolest work environment in Atlanta, and met with folks from their qualitative data, quantitative data, and data science teams to talk surveys, lots of different ways that data is used, and some of the many security and policy issues that arise when you send over 1,000,000,000 emails every day, as Mail Chimp does. And we had a beautiful walk up and down the BeltLine to get there and back!

In 10th Grade Projects we had a very busy week. On Monday, we heard from Dr. Joseph Brown, a professor in the civil engineering department at Georgia Tech whose focus is water quality innovation, and one of his PhD students Arjun Bir. They talked to the students about and demonstrated various different types of water quality tests, how to read them, and the their reliability. On Tuesday, students had a acid/base lesson and took an open note quiz. Wednesday, we heard from Water Technology Quality Manager at Coke, Laurie Gilmore, who talked about the water purification process that Coke uses and the different types of processes other companies use to make sure their water is drinkable. On Thursday, we traveled out to Johns Creek to tour the North Fulton Water Reclamation Facility. We had an awesome tour from Debra Ewing their program manager, who took us on the detailed journey of water as it is flushed down the toilet or drain and it’s process before it is released back into the Chattahoochee River. It was quite an interesting and informative trip! The students even left with a souvenir water bottle. This weekend your student should (if they haven’t already) identify a neighbor on another street who is willing to provide a water sample to your student once a week for the next 4 weeks. Your student will have a water sample bag to collect the sample. Please make sure your student collects and brings a sample from the tap of both your home and neighbor’s home on Monday, September 26th. The sample should be kept out of sunlight, preferably in a cool room or refrigerator.

Entrepreneurship students had a week full of working on their ventures, workshops on pitching and branding and mentorship from our Entrepreneurs in Residence. Teams put together Key Performance Indicators and set goals for the coming weeks.

In Physics this week we wrapped up our investigation of Newton’s Laws through several different activities. One of those activities was the egg drop challenge, where students designed a device to capitalize on the concept of terminal velocity and protect an egg from a two story drop. Be sure to ask your student how their design faired and to explain some of the components of the winning design. We took a little longer to cover the material for this week so the quiz will take place next Tuesday, September 27. In Chemistry students began to explore the complexity of the periodic table and all the details that it can provide about an element. Next week, we will finish decoding the periodic table before beginning to learn about chemical bonding. InBiology we finished learning about the different types of cells, the organelles inside of them, and their jobs within the cell. We also took a trip to the Georgia Aquarium to check out their Washed Ashore exhibit, which displays plastic containers retrieved from the ocean in various animal shapes, along with information regarding the plastics and the environments they affect. Biology students will be teaming with Design students to create their own version of the exhibit, which will have a more permanent home inside of the Georgia Aquarium.

This afternoon, Michelle Nunn, former US Senate candidate, current CEO of Care International, joined us for a very special version of our Speaker Series. Today we tried something new, as 11th grader Alyssa Tirrell took the stage to interview Michelle for an hour about her life, her work at Care, politics, and the profound challenges of getting people to care about complex issues in a media environment where there are so many other messages competing for our attention. It was inspiring and thought-provoking for all of us, and we’re especially proud of Alyssa, whose incredible preparation let her seem like a seasoned interviewer having an off-the-cuff conversation as she chatted with Michelle. Kudos!
Hope everyone has a good weekend.
Peter

The post The Infamous Weekly Update appeared first on The New School.

]]>
https://tnsatlanta.org/blog/infamous-weekly-update/feed/ 0
Choosing the Right High School: One Parent’s Story https://tnsatlanta.org/blog/choosing-the-right-high-school/ https://tnsatlanta.org/blog/choosing-the-right-high-school/#respond Fri, 02 Sep 2016 17:28:39 +0000 http://tnsatlanta.org/?p=1356541

This is an exciting and anxious time for us as parents of a high school senior. While our son is responsible for all the hard effort, we have to live with the decision that we chose when it came to high school.    The biggest choice that we ever had to make came at the […]

The post Choosing the Right High School: One Parent’s Story appeared first on The New School.

]]>

This is an exciting and anxious time for us as parents of a high school senior. While our son is responsible for all the hard effort, we have to live with the decision that we chose when it came to high school.   

The biggest choice that we ever had to make came at the end of his freshman year at our local public school. We knew our son was smart (insert parent bias here) but had a streak of disorganization about him. Basically, he forgot to turn in homework. To us this seemed like a fairly small hurdle to overcome; we thought all that was needed was a little basic parent/teacher communication, but by the end of his freshman year it was clear that we needed an “Intervention”.

We had heard talk that a new school (lowercase because they still hadn’t come up with their name yet) was forming and that they were going to have an open house in Inman Park. To say that our son was less than excited by the thought of leaving his friends and current high school would be an understatement, but he agreed to go and sit in on the session. To our surprise, he went prepared and asked a lot of really good questions (hum, maybe we’re on to something we thought?). After the session he went home and immediately filled out the school application all by himself without any prodding (hum, and what have they done with our son?). On the day of the student interview he came home from school went upstairs and showered, put on nice clothes, combed his hair and offered snacks and drinks to Peter and James when they arrived (aliens, must be that aliens swapped kids during the night). Our son was totally on board with The New School (Really? They named it The New School?) next we had to convince TNS that taking on at least one sophomore along with their initial class of freshmen was a good idea, which eventually they did.

Before our son entered The New School, he was one of those shy quiet kids who goes un-noticed in most normal high school classes. Let me tell you, The New School is not your normal high school experience. From day one the kids were thrust out into the community where they were required to actively engage with people on the street, business owners and even the homeless (not as bad as it sounds. Everyone could probably benefit from this exercise). During his first year we started to notice that he became much more self assured and aware of the world around him. Except for the occasional milk in the cupboard and cereal in the refrigerator, we were seeing progress.

Each Friday he would come home excited to talk about the latest speaker and how the students were allowed to be part of the experience by asking questions. One time he mentioned that the speaker was caught off guard because she was not used to having to answer such direct questions and said if she ever came back, she was going to have to do a better job preparing.

We also noticed that our son was starting to see a world where he could effect change and didn’t feel like he had little or no control, I was into my second or third year of college before I got that message. The New School speaks to the kids on more of an adult level. They seem to have greater expectations of the kids, and the kids respond accordingly.

Another change that we notice in our son is that when adults started listening to him and taking his points of view seriously, he started to speak up more and venture out of his shell. He has much more confidence when he talks to adults. I tease him that I think he finds it easier to speak in front of an adult than one of his peers. Additionally, if he decides he would like to try a new activity, he first does a little research and then jumps in head first. Some of these activities came through connections with The New School, such as an internship with a local farmer’s market and an internship with a local serial entrepreneur (now a paid position as a project manager). Other activities are interests of his own design, such as Swing Dancing and Volleyball.

Sure, we have had bumps along the way, as there would be with any startup. At the beginning we were concerned about accreditation, class rigor, and especially how colleges would view a kid graduating from a class of two (That’s not a typo. There are 2 seniors in the class of 2017). Accreditation went smoothly. As for class rigor and the colleges’ perception, we’ll let you know in May.

There are so many other areas I haven’t touched on that have added to the value of the experience our son has received. Hopefully after he graduates, he can write his own blog and say something in his own words. I know that right now our son is feeling a tremendous amount of pressure to prove to everyone that he made the right choice in enrolling in The New School. What he doesn’t know is that he has already shown us that he/we did.

Thank you, New School, for seeing the need for a school where students learn through experience.

Ripp Davey, Parent of a Senior in the TNS Class of 2017

 

The post Choosing the Right High School: One Parent’s Story appeared first on The New School.

]]>
https://tnsatlanta.org/blog/choosing-the-right-high-school/feed/ 0
The Entrepreneurship Program Launches https://tnsatlanta.org/news/entrepreneurship-program-launches/ https://tnsatlanta.org/news/entrepreneurship-program-launches/#respond Sat, 27 Aug 2016 16:01:20 +0000 http://tnsatlanta.org/?p=1355105

The New School Entrepreneurship Program kicked off last week with the $5 challenge. Participants (the entire 11th grade class) had just an evening to plan, $5 in cash, and 2 hours (on an awkward Thursday morning) to earn as much money and create as much social value as possible in the time. This afternoon the […]

The post The Entrepreneurship Program Launches appeared first on The New School.

]]>

The New School Entrepreneurship Program kicked off last week with the $5 challenge. Participants (the entire 11th grade class) had just an evening to plan, $5 in cash, and 2 hours (on an awkward Thursday morning) to earn as much money and create as much social value as possible in the time. This afternoon the teams astonished a panel of judges as they presented their results and reflections.

Highlights included:
– Dropping Pokemon Lures on the Beltline to attract more people to a busking viola player.
– Washing car windows, while simultaneously sourcing new potential entrepreneur partners for the program (making a $62 profit in about an hour!)
– A glorious pivot from selling water in Piedmont park to giving away water for free advice (and donations).
– Selling deliveries from the local coffee shop to lowerclassmen stuck in other classes.
– Reinvesting profits into One Acre Fund.
– A donut raffle.
– One team (unsuccessfully) attempted to re-invest the $12 profit they had just made in another team.
– One group even managed to sell their presentation slot to a tutoring company (the Facebook publicity here is a nice bonus they didn’t know they were getting – Success Prep Tutoring)!

And lots and lots of valuable lessons – the $5 turned out to be a red herring, and that the students already had the creativity, skills and resourcefulness to earn a profit and add tremendous value.

Thanks to our judges, Lauren Weiniger (Growth City Partners), Jason Long(Tangent Solutions), and Marshall Seese Jr. (Mogwli), for their excellent input, questions, and support!

The post The Entrepreneurship Program Launches appeared first on The New School.

]]>
https://tnsatlanta.org/news/entrepreneurship-program-launches/feed/ 0